How to hold a tennis racket

The way to hold a tennis racket determines how the ball will behave when you hit it. There are 6 popular handles for the tennis racket, and all of them have a place and purpose within the game. Once you’ve mastered the continental (basic) grip, moving on to more sophisticated grips will be easy. These steps will guide you to use all the grips and know about how to hold a tennis racket.

Holding a Tennis RacketsHolding a Tennis Rackets

How to hold a tennis racket Properly

Learn right grips

Dominate the continental hilt. To place your hand on the continental grip, hold the racket pointing outward with your left hand. Orient the stringing area so that it is perpendicular to the ground. Extend your right hand as if you were going to shake hands with the racquet handle, and place the base knuckle of your index finger on the small, slanted side of the handle, to the right of the flat side on top. Close your hand around the handle so that this same angle of the handle goes in a diagonal direction, going through your palm and pointing towards the base of the thumb, under your little finger. The continental grip:

  • It is the most basic forehand grip in tennis.
  • It is standard for serves and preferred for volleys. [1]
  • It is difficult to use to work with topspin or cut shots.

Use the right grip East. To place your hand on the right-hand grip East, start by holding the racket pointing outward with your left hand. Orient the stringing area so that it is perpendicular to the ground. Extend your right hand as if you were going to shake hands with the racket handle, and place the base knuckle of your index finger on the long, flat side of the handle, pointing out and to your right.

Close your hand around the handle so that this same angle of the handle goes in a diagonal direction, going through your palm and pointing towards the base of the thumb, under your little finger. The right grip East:

  • It is a classic and versatile grip that is good for direct or cut shots.
  • It is basic but still used by many professionals.
  • Not optimal for topspin shot, either inbound or outbound.

Try the semi west grip. To achieve the semi-west grip, hold the racket pointing outward with your left hand. Orient the stringing area so that it is perpendicular to the ground. Extend your right hand as if you were going to shake hands with the racket handle, and place the base knuckle of your index finger on the small, slanted side of the handle, pointing down and to your right. Close your hand around the handle so that this same angle of the handle goes in a diagonal direction, going through your palm and pointing towards the base of the thumb, under your little finger. The semi west grip:

  • It is a grip that tilts your racket down, generating an upward shot and promoting a topspin shot.
  • It is the revolutionary grip preferred by many professionals.
  • Not good for hitting cuts or hitting low balls. [2]

Achieve the West Grip. Begin by holding the racket pointing outward with your left hand. Orient the stringing area so that it is perpendicular to the ground. Extend your right hand as if you were going to shake hands with the racket handle, and place the base knuckle of your index finger on the flat side of the handle, located at the bottom. Close your hand around the handle so that this same angle of the handle goes in a diagonal direction, going through your palm and pointing towards the base of the thumb, under your little finger. The West Grip:

  • Generates extreme topspin shots.
  • It is very bad for low balls, cut shots or direct hits.

Learn Eastern Forehand Grip

This was the most common tennis forehand grip used. Roger Federer and several other pro tennis players are still using this eastern forehand grip. This allows a good combination of power and spins in your forehand.

To try the previous grip, keep the palm of your hand out with the mouth. Then, place the racket with the strings facing your hand. Close your hand around the grip and you get the previous grip for your forehand.

Your palm should be on the side of the grip while you are in the ready position – the strings on the side.

you are learning here holding a tennis racket right? If you are a left-hander tennis player you must know what is the best tennis racket for left handers .

Learn reverse grips

Use the East reverse grip. To achieve the East Backhand Grip, use your left hand to hold the racket in front of you. Point the handle to the right and orient the stringing area perpendicular to the ground in front of you. Extend your right hand straight forward directly over the handle. Lower your hand so that the base knuckle of your index finger is completely on the top side of the handle, and close your hand around it. The reverse grip This:

  • It is the most common reverse grip.
  • It is a versatile and stable grip that can generate small topspin shots or hit more directly.
  • It is good for hitting low balls, but not so good for controlling high balls.

Try the East End Grip or Semi West Backhand Grip. To place your hand in the eastern or semi-western grip position, hold the racket pointing outward with your left hand. Orient the stringing area so that it is perpendicular to the ground. Extend your right hand as if you were going to shake hands with the racket handle, and place the base knuckle of your index finger on the small, slanted side of the handle, just to the left of the flat top.

Close your hand around the handle so that this same angle of the handle goes in a diagonal direction, going through your palm and pointing towards the base of the thumb, under your little finger. This grip:

  • It is used only by more advanced players.
  • It is good for controlling high balls and generating topspin shots.
  • It is difficult to hit close to the net and bad to hit low balls.

Master the two-handed backhand grip. The most common way to perform a two-handed backhand is by placing your dominant hand on the continental grip (base knuckle of the index finger on the sloping upper right side) and then placing the other hand just above it on the semi-western right grip ( base knuckle of the index finger on the lower left side inclined). This grip:

  • It is much more powerful than a one-handed backhand.
  • It makes it difficult to cut punches, volley, and stretch your arm for wider shots.

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Also, check our Women’s Tennis rackets reviews here

Final Words

Here We have completed our article about How to hold a tennis racket to help you become a batter golfer. Hopefully, this article will help you. You can also read an article about beginner Tennis racket to know which is the Best tennis racquet for beginners.

Thanks for reading this article have a good journey with Tennis.

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